Course Catalogue

Opening of each course on offer is not guaranteed and depends on the interest of students in a particular course. In case a course proposed in the Learning Agreement is not open, another course will be offered with respective changes to the Learning Agreement so as the total number of ECTS-credits is maintained.

  • Study groups from 10 students – lectures, seminars
  • Study groups up to 10 students – individual tuition

 

Business Economics

Course Title
Business Economics
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits 4
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 20
Objectives and content: The module provides the students with the introduction to the basic terms of managing business. The course concentrates on managing business issues and the first phases of business life-cycle. Start-up activities and determinants of healthy business practices and economic decision making are discussed. It provides overview of basic forms of economic subjects and specifies their relationships and importance of well-functioning enterprises to national economy.

Learning outcomes: This introductory course characterises major business topics for starting-up and successful running of business ventures. After completion of this course the students shall understand the major determinants of managing business, business environment and its stakeholders and coping with usual business problems.

Course outline:
  • Introduction to business
  • Managing business, business environment, stakeholders
  • Vision, mission, goals of a company
  • Organisational and business structure
  • Introduction to cost management
  • Introduction to company management (business strategy)
  • Production activity
  • Company life-cycle
Literature:
  • Bygrave William D.; Zacharakis, Andrew. Entrepreneurship. Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2014. ISBN 978-1-118-80573-2.
  • Pride William M., Business, 12th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning, 2008.
Seminar Paper (4 ECTS):
  • Students can select their own topic from the area of Business Economics I. The topic has to be approved by the lecturer.

Business Economics II

Course Title
Business Economics II
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
4
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Objectives and content: The module introduces an analysis of business operations from several standpoints. In particular, it concentrates on company management, purchasing and selling activities, on managing the firm’s production, financial analysis and on problems of funding and investment decision making.

Learning outcomes: After completion of this course the students will understand major determinants of running successful business. The student should understand how well is the business managed and where the weak and the strong points of business performance are. Students will also recognise where and when to apply specific analytical methods.

Course outline:
  • The fundamentals of costing, calculation unit costs, calculation options
  • Breakeven analysis and limiting factor analysis
  • Financial activity, analysis
  • Investment appraisal techniques
  • Purchase, selling and marketing activity
  • Introduction to controlling
  • Specifics of business – ethics, sustainability and corporate responsibility
Literature:
  • Pride William M., Business, 12th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning, 2008.
  • Cokins, G. Activity-based Cost Management: An Executive's Guide,  John Wiley and Sons, 2001.
Seminar Paper (4 ECTS): The student will work out a case study on a selected topic from the area of Business Economics II - see the course outline. The topic has to be approved by the lecturer.

Business English

Course Title
Business English (A2)
Degree Programme
Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Number of hours (classes/self study) 20/110
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Required level of English B2-C1 level of Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
Objectives and content: The VSEM course of Business English contains a range of business English topics that includes components designed to meet the needs of learners who either need to learn Business English through English or perform familiar business tasks in English. Business English ("A2") represents the third level of English courses at VSEM. The course consists of ten units, each of them focussing on one particular area: economics, business economics, management, marketing, advertising and public relations, human resources, accounting and finance, banking, ICT, law. The VSEM Book of Business English draws upon a rich source of authoritative and topical articles from the business world.

  • The aim of the course is to help students acquire business English vocabulary and to develop their communication and reading skills in English.
Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students should be able to:
  • work with authentic sources
  • understand and actively use vocabulary of the above-stated areas
  • lead a fluent discussion with peers
Basic literature:
  • PRŮŠOVÁ, D.: Business English, VŠEM, 2011
Recommended literature:
  • BLACK, J., HASHIMZADE, N., MYLES, G., Oxford Dictionary of Economics, OUP, 2009
  • Oxford Dictionary of Business and Management, OUP, 2009
Completion of the course: Written test consisting of 2 parts:
  • Reading comprehension test: a text (approximately 300 words) is followed by 5 questions proving comprehension)
  • 35 multiple choice questions focussed on professional vocabulary

Czech for Beginners

Course Title Czech for Beginners
Degree Programme
Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Number of hours (classes/self study) 24/54
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Objectives and content:
  • Czech for Beginners is a course that teaches „survival Czech“.
  • It is designed for beginners who want to reach the A1 communication level; however, they want to do so by communicative methods with less emphasis on grammar.
Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students should be able to:
  • understand and react in the basic communicative situations they encounter.
  • use a basic, but practical vocabulary of 550 words.
Basic literature:
  • HOLÁ, L.: Czech Express 1, Akropolis, Praha, 2007
Recommended literature:
  • a bilingual dictionary (Czech-English, English-Czech)
Completion of the course:
  • Written test

Economic and Social Innovations

Course Title 
Economic and Social Innovations
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Objectives and content:  This subject familiarises the student with the basic terms in the area of innovation, clarifying and practicing with the use of case studies of best practices in innovation. The objective is to understand the importance and characteristics of innovation and the innovation system as a key factor of socioeconomic development and quality of life in a wider spectrum of contexts, i.e. in countries and regions at various levels of economic and social maturity (distance from the levels of best practice), in various fields according to the type of technology regime and entrepreneurial opportunities, in various institutional sectors (commercial, government, non-governmental, not-for-profit/civil and other combinations), in various types of application (social, economic, technical, non-technical innovation). A key role is played by innovation actors, who create value (market and non-market) due to their innovative capacity, which can be supported by innovations and creative techniques, planning of innovations or specific financing tools that take into account the risk of innovation activities.
 
  • Innovation as a system and creator of value: History of innovation and innovation studies. innovation systems and their components (national, field and regional system, innovation sectors, innovation actors and their relationships), (Rothwell) generations of innovation models and (Berkout) model of cyclical innovation, innovation as a creator of value (market, non-market), profit and non-profit goals of innovation (economic, technical, social innovation).
  • Innovation process and planning innovation: Phases of the innovation cycle (seeking opportunities, formulating solutions, implementing innovations, obtaining created value), (Keely) types and sources of innovation, innovation portfolio, (Kumar modes) of the innovation planning process and their methods, innovation as part of strategy, institutionalisation of innovation (forms of protection, commercialisation and market exploitation), innovation metrics.
  • Innovation capacity: Internal (individual, organizational) and external sources of innovation, importance and relationships of creativity, invention, and innovation, innovation culture in an organization, creation and development of an innovation team, generation of innovation ideas and their selection, types of innovators (innovation leaders), innovation and creative techniques and tools, workplace innovation.
  • Financing innovation: Specifications and tools/models for financing innovation activities (risk capital, seed funds, spin-offs, spin-outs, crowdfunding, social impact investment/bonds, financing cross-sector partnerships) and their sources (private, governmental, and combined), indirect financing of innovation activities.
  • Technological modes and entrepreneurial opportunities: industry and field innovation systems, enabling and industrial technologies, types of industries/companies according to innovation intensity and type of opportunity (creative, adaptive business), innovation and knowledge based capital in the global value chain and types of upgrading.
  • Regional and local innovation: Regional and local innovation and entrepreneurial systems, Triple Helix model, cross-sector relationships and their support (innovation infrastructure), innovation ecosystem, creation and implementation of regional innovation strategies, smart specialisation, innovation clusters, smart towns and communities.
  • Social innovation: Key characteristics of social innovation (in comparison with economic/technical innovation), types of social innovation, social innovation and innovators in commercial, government, and not-for-profit sectors and combinations thereof, the innovation cycle and its phases, innovation intensity and social impact, activation and empowerment of disadvantaged target audiences, forms of support of social innovation.
  • Innovation in alternative business models: Social (non-profit) commerce and entrepreneurialism, corporate social responsibility, non-monetary economics, crowdsourcing, innovation in public administration, innovation in social (non-market) services (education, social security, health care), alternative valuation of innovation impact.
  • Innovative solutions to social challenges: Technological and social megatrends, innovation solutions in the energy industry (safe, clean, efficient energy), transportation (green, intelligent, and integrated), climate change, equality (social integration) and safety, population (health, demographic change, quality of life), food safety and sustainable agriculture, combination of social and technical innovations.
  • Innovation in socioeconomic development: Characteristics of innovation according to the economic status of the country, innovation in globalized economy, evaluation of innovation programs and policies, community/participatory development, inclusive innovation, grassroots innovation, relationship between innovation and associated policies, innovation in development of aid, capacity for resilience and its risks

Literature:

  • Osburg, T., Schmidpeter, R. Social Innovation: Solutions for a Sustainable FutureCSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance. Springer Science & Business Media, 2013. 335 p. ISBN 364236540X, 9783642365409

Economic Policy

Course Title
Economic policy
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
4
Term
academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Completion of the course
Attendance 20%, Midterm test 30%, Final test 50%
Objectives and Content:  The course gives a basic introduction to the Economic Policy, both the theoretical and the practical point of view. The goals, types and instruments of the basic areas of microeconomic and macroeconomic policy, and problems of economic and social development are introduced. The course covers following topics:
  • Theoretical and practical basis of the economic policy
  • History of the evolution of the economic policy
  • Conceptual approaches to the economic policy
  • Types of the economic policy
  • Applied economic policy
Learning competences: English at least at FCA level
Learning outcomes: After passing the course, students will able to:
  • understand different approaches to solving the economic issues in different historical and social-economic context
  • take into account different theories from political science, economics and schools of economic and political thoughts
  • orient themselves in various selected economic policies
  • analyse the different impact of policies
  • understand differencies across the countries
Literature:
  • Acecolla, N.: Economic Policy in the age of Globalisation, Cambridge Unversity Press, 2005, ISBN 9780521540384
  • Atkinson, B., Baker, P., Milward, B.: Economic Policy, Palgrave McMillan, 1996, ISBN 9780333650479
  • Persson, T., Tabellini, G.: Political economics: explaining economic policy, The MIT Press, 2002, ISBN 0-262-16195-8
Seminar Paper (4 ECTS):
  • The content of the seminar paper is based on the comparison of the Czech Republic position with other EU member country in attainable time series in stated thematic group of structural indicators.

Economics of Money and Banking

Course Title
Economics of Money nad Banking
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
4
Terms: academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Completion of the course
Details from lecturer on first session
Objectives and content: In this class the logic of the bank business is learned and why and how there is monetary and banking policy.
Bank business is to lend money long-term to borrowers which is held by the bank only short-term by customers’ deposits (circulating in the banking system). The difference between long-term and short-term interest rates is the profit for the bank, but holding (little interest generating) reserves as provision for sudden deposit withdrawals is necessary;
This reserve holding therefore is mostly outsourced to a central reserve bank as the Federal Reserve System (Fed) in the United States or the European Central Bank (ECB) in the Euro zone. The reserves are not only covering against sudden withdrawals by depositors from banks but also pay for trade deficits of the country against the rest of the world;
In order to expand the business beyond loans to the business world (and hence being dependent on their fate) banks developed special contract forms to decouple their own business: Swaps (conditional exchanges of rights as currency swaps, interest rate swaps, credit default swaps), and repackaging loans and securities into new bonds (mortgage bonds and others);
Under these conditions of the banking business the central (reserve) banks have different options as holders of liquid reserves in case a bank or several banks suffer from sudden deposit withdrawals: Being Lender of Last Resort or being Dealer of Last Resort;
Beyond that crisis management monetary policy of the Fed and the ECB, opposed by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) is discussed with respect to the business model of banks.
Learning competences: A microeconomics or macroeconomics course of bachelor level.
Learning outcomes: Understand the general vulnerability of any bank at any time to a bank run (mass withdrawals of deposits, also by other banks) and the necessity of a reserve bank in this system; Knowing about the trade balance mechanism, its impact on the credit supply of banks and what the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has to do with this; Comprehending the crisis management by central banks and the broader approaches of central banks to use monetary policy to manage the growth of the economy overall.
Literature:
  • Bagehot, Walter, Lombard Street : A Description of the Money Market, Reprint 1897 edition (11873), Sioux Falls SD : NuVision Publications 2008, ISBN: 978-1595-47577-0. the still actual classic is also available at http://www.econlib.org/library/Bagehot/bagLom.html
  • Mehrling, Perry, The New Lombard Street : How the Fed Became the Dealer of Last Resort, Princeton NJ, Oxford : Princeton University Press 2011, ISBN: 978-0691-14398-9.
  • Brei, Michael and Blaise Gadanecz, "Have public bailouts made banks' loan books safer?" BIS Quarterly Review, September 2012, 61-72.
  • Websites: Feseral Reserve http://www.federalreserve.gov/; European Central Bank http://www.ecb.europa.eu/ ; Bank of England http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/ ; Swiss National Bank http://www.shttp://www.snb.ch/en/ ; Czech National Bank http://www.cnb.cz/en/index.html ; International Monetary Fund http://www.imf.org/; Bank for International Settlements http://www.bis.org/.

Seminar Paper (4 ECTS):

  • Topics from lecturer on first session.
Special: For students interested an extracurricular excursion to the Prague Stock Exchange (also the commodity exchange of the country) and to the Czech National Bank is offered.

European Economic Integration

Course Title
European Economic Integration
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
4
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Completion of the course
Attendance 20%, Midterm test 30%, Final test 50%
Objectives and content: The main aim of the course is to give a brief introduction of the European economic integration processes after the World War II. The structure of the course is devided into the several topics:
  • Basic theoriesof economic integration
  • Historical development of the European integration
  • The institutional achitecture and the procedural aspect of the EU
  • Common policies
  • Coordinated policies
  • European monetary union
  • Lisabon Treaty reform
Learning competences: English at least at FCA level
Learning outcomes: After passing the course, students will able to:
  • orient in the structure of EU institutions
  • understand the development of the integration in the Europe
  • orient themselves in the common and coordinated policies
  • analyse the different impacts of policies for member states
  • have knowledge of the latest developments, events and policies in the European region
Literature:
  • EL AGRAA, A.M. (ed.) (2007). The European Union : Economics and Policies. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-511-33424-5 (eBook), 978-0-521-69727-9.
  • EC (2007): How the European Union works: Your guide to the EU institutions. European Commission. 50 pp. ISBN 92-79-03653-X.
  • BALDWIN, R., WYPLOSZ, Ch. (2006). The Economics of European Integration. 2nd edition. The McGraw-Hill Education. 464p. ISBN 0-077-111192.
  • EP (2009): Fact sheets on the European Union. European Parliament. 517 p. ISBN 978-92-823-2469-1.
  • LEONARD, D. (2005). Guide to the European Union. 9th ed. London : The Economists. 342 p. ISBN 1-86197-930-4.
  • PELKMANS, J. (2006). European Integration : Methods and Economic Analyses. 3rd ed. London : Pearson Education Limited. 480 p. ISBN: 978-0-273-69449-6.
Seminar Paper (4 ECTS):
  • Eurobarometers
  • Common Agricultural Policy reform
  • Competition policy
  • Accession criteria for candidate countries
  • Growth and Stability Pact
  • energy Policy

Financial Management

Course Title 
Financial Management
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 20
Objectives and content: The financial side of business represents the flows and conversion of money from initial investment, through financing operations, to sale of results of the transformation process, increased through added value representing the investor reward for the risk undertaken by investing. The monetary side of a business is realised through finance strategy and management. The basic goal of this subject is to familiarise the student with the purpose of financial management, namely the fundamental task of the financial management of a business, which is the identification of sources of capital and their acquisition, decision-making on the goals and conditions of its allocation, securing efficient handling of available sources of capital, reallocation, and distribution of capital acquired through the execution of business activity.

  • Principles of financial strategies and financial management: Business development assumes definition and establishment of a finance policy – the company finance strategy. The finance strategy represents the backbone of financial management, which includes all activities associated with the effective financing of company entrepreneurial activities oriented toward achieving the company strategy and basic goals of the company.
  • Funding – seeking out and using internal and external capital sources: Basic sources of financial business activities are internal sources, external equity sources and other sources. Use of capital is associated with capital costs. Costs are differentiated into debt costs (debt capital) and costs of equity capital. From the perspective of financial management average capital costs and the associated optimal capital structure are important.
  • Short-term and long-term financial management: Investing is one of the basic company activities. It is a process which is based on the strategic plan and is carried out through the long-term financial plan. The basic objective of an investment strategy transcribed into the long-term plan is economic efficiency of the investment process, i.e. effective handling of financial resources under conditions of risk and uncertainty. Another task of financial management is management of debt. A task of short-term financial management is to manage liquidity using the short-term financial plan.
  • Measuring financial performance and creation of company value: The basic objective of a contemporary company is the creation of stakeholder value. Approaches to the management of company performance from the perspective of value drivers are carried out primarily through value based management. Knowledge of the principles of value based management is a critical prerequisite to successful financial management.
  • Company valuation: Combining, purchasing, and selling companies is a common phenomenon in a strongly competitive environment enabling the establishment of competitive advantage over a rival. Carrying out mergers and acquisitions are not possible without the accurate valuation of a company. Knowledge of methods of market valuation of companies is a critical prerequisite to executing the sale and purchase of a company.

Literature:

  • Brigham, E., Ehrhardt, M. Financial Management: Theory & Practice. Cengage Learning, 2013. 1200 p. ISBN 9781111972202.
  • Higgins, R. Analysis for Financial Management. 2015. 466 p. ISBN 9781259294228.

Human Resources

Course Title
Human Resources
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
4
Terms: academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Objectives and content: The subject introduces basic tasks of staff department as the
concept of human resources management. The work of staff department is introduced as
the central managerial task and its strategic importance is emphasized. Attention is paid
to the purpose and content of key staff department activities.
  • Introduction to Organizational Behavior
  • Human Resource Management: The Challenges
  • Planning and Implementing Strategic HR Policies
  • Staffing (Recruiting and Managing Employees)
  • Personality and Attitudes
  • Learning and Reinforcement
  • Managing the Training Process
  • Motivation in the Work Setting
  • Group and Team Behavior
  • Developing Employee Relations
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Decision Making in Organizations
  • Organizational Culture
  • Case studies of real life situations
  • Teaching ethics in business today
Seminar Paper (4 ECTS): Topics from the lector on first session.
Literature:
  • Chaudhuri, K. K.: Human resource management. 2010. ISBN 9788184886528 (e-book)
  • Lawler, Edward E.: Effective human resource management: a global analysis. 2012. ISBN 9780804782685 (e-book)

Human Resource Management

Course Title
Human Resource Management
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms: academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students:
25

Objectives and content: This subject discusses bachelor studies topics focussed on working with people and further deepens this theoretical and practical knowledge in specific areas of management. The objective is the preparation of the graduate in specific fields of practical human resources management. The graduate of the masters level will be capable of analysing and finding causal factors within the company leading to the disruption of harmonic functioning of human capital within the company. The subject will focus on human resources management as a strategic partner in the leadership of an organization. The student will focus more deeply on awareness of the dependencies and outcomes of organizational factors and their impacts on actual strategic management of human resources in practice. An emphasis is placed on understanding and managing results of organisational changes, mergers and acquisitions, including resolving impacts of economic crises. As part of this subject, aspects of human resources will be discussed from legislative, economic, and financial perspectives. Specific conditions are applied both to Czech and international conditions.

  • Theoretical basis and definition of terms: Modern approaches to human resources management. Specific focus on areas with potential growth or elimination of limits. Models of comparative methods for evaluating HRM efficiency. Acquiring market data. Work directly or indirectly with measurable variables. Decision-making process from the perspective of data foundations.
  • Training and development of employees: Influence of training on organizational effectiveness. Training methods – their costs efficiency versus performance efficiency. Managing performance using training and development. Compatibility of training, the training process, and organisational strategies. Planning training, evaluation and work with soft factors. Concept of self-training, motivation to development.
  • Career management: Identification of career management as one of human resources functions. Modern concept of a career - expanding career pathways, directions of careers including horizontal development, job enlargement and enrichment. Methodology of setting up a system of personnel planning. Concept of medium-term and long-term personnel plans. Integration of personnel planning with the company's strategic goals. Process of planned increase and improvement of work competencies, knowledge and skills. Key competencies and their strategic importance. Methods and approaches to career planning. Influence of career management. Building succession plans. Role of personnel and line managers and individual employees in the area of planning.
  • Talent management: Identification of talent and working with it. Personality and its development. Identification of development directions. Use of talent management in organizational human resources - important and benefits of talent management, talent management processes, attracting and acquiring talent, development and retention of talent. International cooperation in use of talent. Managing company image and company culture, marketing of human resources, image of the preferred employer. SRC (Socially Responsible Company). Role of the human resource manager in the new era, participation in building strategies for internal and external communications. Relationship of talent and creation of research, development and innovation.
  • Mobility management: Employee mobility, its causes and effects. Analysis of human resources management and company potential. Most frequent risks in human resources management. Critical roles in human resources management during periods of change and most frequent mistakes of managers. Mobility as career development. Fluctuation and retention of employees. Management of human resources in periods of crisis and economic change. Management of mobility costs. Management of performance during the course of mobility.
  • Knowledge base management: Definition of basic terms. Categorisation of knowledge. Development of knowledge base management in a historical perspective. Process of creating knowledge. Knowledge transfer and sharing. Methods of transferring knowledge in organisations. Continuity management of knowledge. BCM – Business Continuity Management. Age management and working with changing employee demographic structure. Global HR management - impacts of multinational management of businesses in the area of HRM.

Literature:

  • Anderson, V. Research Method in Human Resource Management. 2 vyd. London : Chartered Institute of Personnel Development, 2009.
  • Armstrong, M. A Handbook of Human Resource Management Practice. London : Kogan Page Publishers, 2006.
  • Beazley, H., Boenisch, J., Harden, D. Continuity Management: Preserving Corporate Knowledge and Productivity When Employees Leave. New York: Wiley, 2002.
  • Berger, L., Berger, D. R. Talent Management Handbook: creating organizational excellence by identifying, developing, and promoting your best people. New York : McGraw-Hill, 2003.
  • Boudreau, J. W., Ramstad, P. M. Beyond HR: The New Science of Human Capital. Boston : Harvard Business School Press, 2007.
  • Levy, M. Knowledge Retention: Minimizing Organizational Business Loss. Journal of Knowledge Management, 2011, Vol. 15, Issue 4, pp. 582-600.
  • Ulrich, D., Younger, J., Brockbank, W., Ulrich, M. HR from the Outside In: Six Competencies for the Future of Human Resources Business Pro collection. McGraw Hill Professional, 2012. 272 p. ISBN 0071802673, 9780071802673.
  • Vaiman, V., Vance, C. M. Smart Talent Management: Building Knowledge Assets for Competitive Advantage. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008.

Periodics:

  • International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management
  • International Journal of Knowledge Management
  • Human Resource Management Journal
  • Journal of Management
  • Journal of Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management Research and Practice

Internet web pages:

  • Academy of Management, www.aomonline.org
  • Harvard Business Review, www.hbr.org

Management

Course Title
Management
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Objectives and content: The subject introduces basic terms and procedures of management within the broader network and decision. It presents terminological and methodological ground for following specialized subjects and for an illustration of applications and specifications in the Czech conditions. It includes basic aspects of subject areas of management regarding their procedural point of view.

  • Nature of management: basic terms, relation of management and administration, definition of management, position of a manager in organization, levels of management in hierarchically structured organization, basic managerial functions and activities.
  • Profile of manager: basic competence of manager, power and responsibility, state of managerial work, head and leader, personality of manager, qualification of manager.
  • Decision-making: decision making as a basic activity of manager, basic terms in the field of decision-making, elements of decision-making, decision-making subject, object of decision-making, criteria of decision-making, origin of the situation to be decided, and role of manager in its solution, information support and decision-making.
  • Planning as basic function of manager: Basic procedures of a plan creation, structure of planning activity according to the hierarchical and functional arrangement of organization.
  • Organizing as basic function of manager: Basic terms in organizing, classification of organizational structures, line organization, line and staff organization, organization according to function. Division organization. Flexible organizational structures. Matrix organization as a transfer point between stable and flexible organizational forms. Organizational forms of project administration, project coordination, integrated project organization and pure project organization.
  • Leadership, management of human resources, and communication as a basis of manager function: motivation, influencing, leadership of people, coordination. Importance of management of human resources of firm, personnel work in company, career management, evaluation of workers. General rules of successful communication, forms of communication.
  • Supervision as basic managerial function: basic terms in the field of supervision. Supervision and feedback, structure of supervision activities, evaluation criteria of supervision. Modern approaches to supervision. Internal supervision system of organization. Relation between supervision and controlling.
  • Management in development: Characteristics of history and continuity in time in management development as a practical activity and as a subject as well. Characteristics of individual development stages, their importance and personalities with the emphasis on the evolution of current trends (from searching for perfection, through organizational solution of “chaos”, to information management and reengineering).
Literature:
  • Donnelly J., Gibson, L. J., Ivancevich, J. M. Fundamentals of Management, 10th Edition, Richard D. Irwin, INC. 1997, ISBN 978-0256232370.
  • Haberberg, A., Rieple, A. Strategic Management: Theory and Application. OUP Oxford, 2008. 822 p. ISBN 9780199216468.
  • Koontz,H., Weihrich, H. Essentials of Management. An International Perspective. The McGraw Hill Companies, 2010, ISBN 978-0-07-106767.
  • Drucker, P., Maciariello, J. Management (Revised Edition), Harper Collins Publishers, New York, 2008, ISBN 978-0-06-125266-2.
  • Drucker, P. Management Challenges for the 21st Century, Harper Collins Publishers, New York, 1999. ISBN 0-88730-998-4.
  • Drucker, P. The Practice of Management. Harper Collins Publishers, New York, 1986, ISBN 0-887-30-613-6.

Managerial Economics

Course Title 
Managerial Economics
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 20
Objectives and content: The subject introduces the basic issues of economic thinking in the context of interdisciplinary perception of social values and their relevance for the development of the society and, at the same time, presents the fundamental concepts and principles of macroeconomic theory in order to master the conceptual architecture and the theoretical-methodological fundaments for the identification, analysis, evaluation and anticipation of key characteristics and determinants of the development of the macroeconomic framework for the decision-making of economic entities.
 
  • Values and their relevance for the society: The universality of human rights, communication freedom and responsibility and human community, democracy and capitalism, free market and public benefit, crises and social changes.
  • Macroeconomic aggregates: Definitions and measurement. GDP, inflation, unemployment, public expenditure. Impact of price level changes on the gross domestic product.
  • Aggregate demand and supply: The substance of the model and its assumptions. Factors affecting the aggregate demand. Factors affecting the aggregate supply. The balancing mechanism and balance in the short term and in the long term. Economic cycle and economic growth.
  • Inflation and unemployment: Major determinants, basic forms, symptoms and consequences of inflation and unemployment in the economy. Relation between the inflation rate and the unemployment rate – Phillips curve. The impact of various types of expectations on the relation between the inflation rate and the unemployment rate.
  • Open economy: Foreign exchange rate. Demand, supply and exchange market balance. Theory of foreign exchange rate determination, theory of interest rate parity and theory of purchasing power parity. Fixed and flexible foreign exchange rate. Balance of payments structure. Balancing mechanisms of the balance of payments. Foreign indebtedness. International trade theory.
  • Monetary and fiscal policies: Fiscal policy instruments. Keynesian transmission mechanism. Quantitative equation of money. Short-term and long-term impact of monetary policy. Ineffectiveness of monetary policy. Public budgets and public debt. Short-term and long-term impact of fiscal policy. Crowding-out effect. Monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy.

Literature:

  • Acecolla, N. Economic Policy in the age of Globalisation. Cambridge Unversity Press, 2005, ISBN 9780521540384.
  • Boyes, W., Melvin, M. Makroeconomics. United Kingdom: Cengage Learning, 2010.
  • Dwivedi, D. N. Managerial Economics, 7E. Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd, 2009. 880 p. ISBN 8125923470, 9788125923473.

Marketing

Course Title
Marketing
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 30
Objective and content: This subject derives the resources for establishing businesses in sustainable markets from the markets themselves. It operates from the concept of marketing strategy, particularly the process in which the delivery of new resources may increase sustainability and competitiveness of a personal project for acquisition of a market segment.
  • Marketing and marketing strategies: Differentiating marketing from other forms of occupying a market. Marketing core concepts. Strategic aspects of marketing and social marketing
  • Formulation of strategies: Recognition of the approaches for deriving resources. Marketing plans from the perspective of content and process characteristics, identification of desirable uses, risks, and new resources for terminating processes.
  • Strategy implementation: Resources for understanding, documenting, querying, demonstrating conformance, delivery, flexibility, and productivity of the project manager in the project cycle.
  • Marketing strategies in global markets: The Uppsala Model, Born Global, acculturation and enculturation.
  • Competition in strategic marketing: Strategies of market leaders, challengers, followers, nichers, and sustaining the power distance index, or position. Maximising stability of performance through breaking, extending, and combinations of competitor life curves and buy/sell timing. Market harmonisation, programmed distribution.
  • Seller marketing strategies:  Testing and launching products and services on the market. Pricing strategies. Sources of satisfaction and relation of customer to the shop.
  • Innovations in strategic marketing: Metrology in emerging markets. Projected movement. Management of product and market development.
  • Scientific methods for strategic marketing: Methods, techniques, data, data mining, experimentation, research, survey.
Literature:
  • Grewal, D. LL Marketing with Practice Marketing Access Card. McGraw-Hill Education, 2012. ISBN 9780077713294.
  • Pride, W. Ferrell. Marketing 2014. Cengage Learning, 2013. 832 p. ISBN 9781133939252.

Internet web pages:

 

Periodicals:

  • International Marketing Review
  • Fresh Marketing

Marketing Management

Course Title
Marketing Management
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
4
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
Objectives and content: The course introduces basic concepts of strategic marketing, provides overview of approaches, methods and procedures which are prerequisites for creation of strategic documents as one of the basic requirements for business prosperity.

•    Marketing and its development to strategic marketing
•    Input analyses and development predictions
•    Marketing objectives and strategies
•    Strategies of individual components of marketing mixture
•    Strategy implementation and control
 

Seminar Paper (4 ECTS):

•    Strategic analysis of a selected company
•    Achieving a competitive strategic advantage in contemporary business: Search Engine Marketing
•    Business strategy as a key to success: Plan for a new venture

Market Research

Course Title 
Market Research
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 25
 
Objectives and content: Students will learn practical marketing work in the marketing department of an international marketing company. Lectures are maximally focused on collective solutions of marketing tasks via market research.
 
  • Introduction to the marketing research in a company (Where is MR placed in company structure, which tasks it has, which answers could enter and which not, friends and enemies of marketing research? Who are our internal customers? Rules of treating the marketing research results - distribution, confidentiality and access to the information)
  • Work with marketing research agencies/consultants (The differences between marketing research agencies, Pitch – pitch criteria, Design of research, What should agency know and what not, Responsibility of agency- responsibility of client, Suggestions and findings of marketing research, Consulting agencies and their specific art of work)
  • Budget (Introduction to work with budget, Budget structure, Marketing research Budget planning, Marketing research prices, Golden rule – spend everything!, What if money is not enough?)
  • First internal customer: Product Marketing (Studies for Product marketing, Frontloading – before the start of project, PEP, Product Clinic, marketing concept, project starting, influence of customers’ voice on product.  Marketing and Design, Marketing a Controlling)
  • Second internal customer: Marketing Communication (Studies for Marketing Communication, Pretest and Posttest, the right timing. Global or local advertising campaign? Is measurement of effectivity advertising campaign effective? Media and target group , problems in definitive of target group)
  • Third internal customer: Distribution and Service Marketing (Studies for Distribution and Service net, customers satisfaction, dealers satisfaction, how to sell a car – dealers training, Targets of customers satisfaction, CRM)
  • Fourth internal customer: Marketing Director (Golden rule - who pays, governs.  Brand image and strategy studies, Art of generalisation, Rules of communication of awkward information.)
  • Fifth internal customer: Board (How to make a good impression, Art of the absolute generalisation – spaceship effect. What is management summary, Beware of detail, rule of assistants of board in communication process, How to behave on the board meeting)
  • Cooperation of other brands in the group (Tasks of Group Marketing Research, relations with other brands, Shared information and ways of its distribution, co-financing projects-syndicated studies)

Literature

  • Malhotra, N, K.Marketing Research: An Applied Orientation (6th Edition), 2009.  
    ISBN-10: 0136085431, kindle edition.
  • Pride, W. Ferrell. Marketing. Cengage Learning, 2013. 832 p. ISBN 9781133939252.
  • Grewal, D. L. L. Marketing with Practice Marketing Access Card. McGraw-Hill Education, 2012. ISBN 97800777.

Internet

  • Research World, ESOMAR http://www.esomar.org/publications-store/research-world-magazine
  • ISA http://www.isa-sociology.org/
  • http://www.tns-aisa.cz/pg-33-cs.aspx
  • http://www.millwardbrown.com/Solutions/Default.aspx 

Project Management

Course Title 
Project Management
Degree Programme Economics and Management
ECTS credits
5
Terms academic year 2019/2020
Maximum number of students 15
Objectives and content: The objective of this subject is the study and acquisition of methodical knowledge and information pertaining to the processes of project management with an emphasis on understanding the philosophy and practical management of tools and techniques as part of the execution of the project. In conjunction with the requirements of the PMI and IPMA standards, prerequisites will be formed for a systematic approach to using project management to manage projects and create conditions for improving customer orientation and application of new knowledge in change management processes in organizations, whereas knowledge of project management is a basic prerequisite for active participation in projects. A secondary goal is to support motivation for self-study and deeper interest in the application of methods implemented in contemporary projects, the use of which is considered a sign of professionalism.
 
  • Introduction to project management (PMG). PMG in the system of theories and management practices. Basic terms and definitions. Characteristics of a project. Difference between projects and routine processes. Types of projects. Examples of projects. Successful project management. Triple imperative of projects (Barnes triangle). Life cycle and phases – pre-project, project, and post-project. Standards and standardization of project management. PMI and IPMA certifications.
  • Organization of project, project structure. Relationship between ongoing and project management organisational structure. Incorporation of projects into organizational structure. Matrix project structure. Project organization and management, executive, and user roles. Management committee, sponsor, user, interested party. "Project Team Leader" /PTL/ vs. "Project Manager" - position, role, and responsibilities. Competency requirements. Composition of the project team, team cooperation, communication. Responsibility matrix.
  • Project objectives and project scope. Definition of project goals. Context of strategy organization. Project goals (SMART) and project approach. Model process of project kickoff. Scope as a term in the PMBoK. Process according to the PMBoK. Scope as a term in ISO 1006. Processes according to ISO 10006. Specification of project scope. Project Business Case.
  • Project risk management. Importance of risks in project management. Opportunities and risks. Characteristics of risks. Techniques of project risk analysis. Techniques of identification and evaluating risks (verbal, numerical, definition of risk probability and scenarios, risk tree, etc.). Creation of measures for eliminating risks (use of TWS signals, QAS etc.). Phases of risk management. Problems and drawbacks of risk management processes.
  • Project planning. Project time and capacity planning. Division of projects into phases. Defining activity. Structured breakdown of activities. Project breakdown – W/OBS (Work/ Object Breakdown Structure). Definition of logical linkages. Scheduling activities in time.  Cost planning. Resource planning. Project budget - financial and economic aspects of project management.
  • Project execution, project monitoring and controlling. Initiating project execution. Work plan. Project log. Tracking of project processes. Assessing changes and addressing problems. Reporting. Control methods - QAS, TWS, CSF, etc. Subcontractor management system. Quality assurance in projects.
  • Closing projects. Process of closing projects. Executing contracts. Final acceptance, closing the project, summary of outcomes, administrative closure of the project. Final analyses and lessons learned from project execution. Collection of project metrics. "Post-project phases". Evaluation of project resource performance. Approval of project outcomes. PIR. Software support of project planning and management. MS Project as a support tool of project management.

Literature:

  • Kogon, K., Blakemore, S., Wood, J. Project Management for the Unofficial Project Manager: A FranklinCovey Title. BellaBooks Inc., Dallas, Texas, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-941631-10-2.
  • Phillips, J. CAPM/PMP Project Management All-in-One Exam Guide. McGraw Hill Professional, 2007. 478 p. ISBN 9780071487481.